Hardres / Herringwood

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Gaveston

Hardres / Herringwood

Legg inn av Gaveston » 19. februar 2008 kl. 17.39

Burke's Extinct Baronetage (2nd Ed 1844) cites that Philip Hardres
(temp Henry III) married a Grace de Herengod, d of Stephen de
HERENGOD, from whom Hardres received the Manor of Elmestede. Later on
the same page (242) it cites that hid 2GGS Philip Hardres (mind
1400s?) married a Grace HERRINGWOOD, daughter of Stephen Herringwood.
These two instances, supposedly separated by some 200 years, seem all
to similar. Has this been substantiated, or conversely revealed as a
redundancy?

Gjest

Re: Hardres / Herringwood

Legg inn av Gjest » 19. februar 2008 kl. 19.18

On Feb 19, 8:35 am, Gaveston <gpie...@gmail.com> wrote:
Burke's Extinct Baronetage (2nd Ed 1844) cites that Philip Hardres
(temp Henry III) married a Grace de Herengod, d of Stephen de
HERENGOD, from whom Hardres received the Manor of Elmestede. Later on
the same page (242) it cites that hid 2GGS Philip Hardres (mind
1400s?) married a Grace HERRINGWOOD, daughter of Stephen Herringwood.
These two instances, supposedly separated by some 200 years, seem all
to similar. Has this been substantiated, or conversely revealed as a
redundancy?

Good catch. I haven't looked into it, but you are almost certainly
right. The later marriage appears in the 1574 Visitation of Kent, for
whatever that's worth, showing Stephen Heringood as son of Sir Richard
and married to Jane, daughter and coheiress of Sir Thomas Fitzbernard
of Kent.

taf

mrdgen

Re: Hardres / Herringwood

Legg inn av mrdgen » 20. februar 2008 kl. 2.00

Since the Hardres family are ancestors of the Gateway ancestor Mabel
Harlakenden, I have done some research on this family. Although this
story also appears in Halsted's History of Kent, there seems to be no
record (as far as I have found) of a Philip de Hardres during the
reign of king Henry III.

The following is what I have gleaned:

ROBERT DE HARDRES:
In 1262, Robert de Hardres was shown as holding the manor of Hardres
in Kent, England, from Richard de Clare, the earl of Gloucester and
Hertford, and owing one knight's service for the fee [1].
In 1263, Robert held a knight's fee at Hardres, Kent, England, from
Richard, the earl of Cornwall. He served as a commissioner in Essex,
Kent, Sussex, Hertsford, Bedfordshire, and Berkshire on 7 May 1263.
Robert took arms against king Henry III Plantagenet at the siege of
Rochester castle. During the course of the troubles between the king
and his nobles, Robert also seized four houses at Canterbury held by
'Solomon the Jew', but was forced to turn them over to the earl of
Gloucester. As a result of his participation in the baronial revolt
of 1264 and 1265, he was first forced to turn his lands at Hardres
over to Guncelin de Badlesmere in 1264, but since he had never held
the lands directly from the king, his son held Hardres in 1265. He
was pardoned 29 June 1267 for his rebellion against the king "...
provided he does no more damage." [2]

ROBERT HARDRES
Robert Hardres, the son of Robert, was a knight. It is known that
Robert married Margaret de Staingrave (Escingrave; Estingrave),
daughter of Sir Richard de Staingrave. (I have not been able to find
much about Richard de Staingrave. He is probably a close relative of
Robert de Staingrave, who held various royal appointments in Kent and
Sussex at this time.)
In 1282, Robert made a presentation to the church at Hardres, Kent,
England, after having appointed his kinsman John Hardres as rector of
the church [3]. On 10 January 1283, Robert was in prison at
Canterbury on a charge of murder and thereafter in Newgate prison at
London. He was released from prison on 26 May 1290 [2].
On 5 June 1307, Robert was recorded as owing £1000 to John le Blount,
who in turn owed Robert £100 [4]. On 12 December 1311, Robert owed
£20 for rents of lands in Kent [2].
On 5 December 1314, Robert was recorded as holding one and one half
knights' fees at Hardres, Stellinge, Hertaunge, and Berefreyeston in
Kent from Gilbert, the earl of Gloucester [2]. In 1315, Robert and
Margaret jointly received the manor of High Hardres in Kent, England,
from Thomas le Gegge, excepting a portion held by Maud de St. John.
In 1317, Maud de St. John died and Robert and Margaret received her
portion as well.
Robert died 22 January 1323. Margaret then held the manor of High
Hardres, only to be forcibly dispossessed of the manor by Alexander de
Mowbray, who was the keeper of the honor of Tonbridge, who was acting
for king Edward II. On 14 April 1323, an inquisition post mortem was
held into Robert's estate, finding that Margaret and Robert had indeed
jointly held the fief [5].

ROBERT HARDRES
Robert Hardres was 12 years old in 1323 [5]. On 8 July 1323, Richard
de Betonia of London paid £40 for the rights to contract a marriage
for the underage Robert [2].
Like his father, Robert was a knight. Robert married Jane Boughton,
daughter of Thomas Boughton.

HENRY HARDRES
Henry Hardres, a son of Robert by Jane Boughton, married Susan de
Septvans, daughter of John Septvans.
(The 1612 Visitation of Essex states that Henry and Susan were the
parents of a Petronilla Hardres, who married Moses Harlakenden. This
seems to be the only record of this marriage, though several others
state that Moses Harlakenden married a Petronilla. If this is true,
Henry and Susan would be ancestors of Mabel Harlakenden through two
lines.)

PHILLIP HARDRES
Phillip Hardres, a son of Henry Hardres by Susan de Septvans, married
Grace Heringod, a daughter of Stephen Heringod and Jane FitzBernard.

GEORGE HARDRES
George Hardres was a son of Phillip Hardres and Grace Heringod;
George married a daughter of Richard Lucy.
George Hardres is recorded in one pedigree as being alive in 1485
[6].

JAMES HARDRES
James Hardres married Alice Hill, daughter of Robert Hill. She was
the widow of James Aucher, and the mother of Sir Anthony Aucher.
James was recorded as being alive in 1490 [6]. He and Alice were the
parents of two sons, George and Thomas.

THOMAS HARDRES
Thomas first married Dorothy Paston, daughter of Sir John Paston.
After her death, Thomas married Mary Oxinden, daughter of Edward
Oxinden and Alice Barton.
Thomas is said to have served with king Henry VIII Tudor at the siege
of Boulogne, France, in 1544. Boulogne fell to English forces 14
September 1544, and the king left for England on 30 September,
arriving at Dover on 1 October. Between 4 October and 10 October,
king Henry VIII visited Thomas at Hardres Court, and presented Thomas
with the gates of the city of Boulogne [3], [7].
Thomas died in 1556 [6], having three children by Mary Oxinden:
James, Richard, and Elizabeth, who married Roger Harlakenden, and so
was an ancestor of Mabel Harlakenden.

[1] Calendar of Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. I, London, 1904,
inquest #530, pp. 152-155.
[2] Moor, C., Knights of Edward I, Vol. II, part 2, Harleian Soc.
Publ. #81, 1929, p. 185.
[3] Jenkins, Robert C., On the Gates of Boulogne, at Hardres Court, in
the Parish of Upper Hardres, Archeologica Cantiana, 4(1861), p. 46.
[4] Calendar of Close Rolls, 35 Edward I (1307), Membrane 7d.
[5] Calendar of Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. VI, London, 1904,
inquest #443, p. 269.
[6] Seventeenth Century Note Book, The Genealogist, 32(1916), pp.
124-5.
[7] Miscellanea, Archeologia Cantiana, 5(1863), p. 324.

Gjest

Re: Hardres / Herringwood

Legg inn av Gjest » 20. februar 2008 kl. 6.24

On Feb 19, 4:56 pm, mrdgen <mrdar...@gmail.com> wrote:
Since the Hardres family are ancestors of the Gateway ancestor Mabel
Harlakenden, I have done some research on this family. Although this
story also appears in Halsted's History of Kent, there seems to be no
record (as far as I have found) of a Philip de Hardres during the
reign of king Henry III.

There does appear to have been one:

Grant from Amice, Countess of Clare, . . . to Abraham son of Ralph of
Thaxted. 1198-1223. Among the witnesses are Philippo de Hardres and
Laurentio de Hardres.

http://books.google.com/books?id=M4czS2 ... dOidA0T53A

"One of the earliest depictions of a donor figure in English stained
glass was in the parish church of Upper Hardres in Kent, where Philip
and Salomon de Hardres were depicted before the Virgin and Child in a
window of c.1250, since destroyed by fire."

http://books.google.com/books?id=0vMthf ... fSqMhSuUwU

"Kent. Dies dat' Jacobo de Hage . po . lo . Phil de Hardres . 't fribz
Hospital de plac adv eccle de Hardres ad aud Jud suu a die Pasch i .
iij. sept."

_Rotuli ciriae regis_ (second half of King John)
http://books.google.com/books?id=bqsDAA ... #PPA127,M1


taf

mrdgen

Re: Hardres / Herringwood

Legg inn av mrdgen » 20. februar 2008 kl. 9.04

Nice. Thank you.

Gaveston

Re: Hardres / Herringwood

Legg inn av Gaveston » 20. februar 2008 kl. 16.01

On Feb 20, 12:20 am, t...@clearwire.net wrote:
On Feb 19, 4:56 pm, mrdgen <mrdar...@gmail.com> wrote:

Since the Hardres family are ancestors of the Gateway ancestor Mabel
Harlakenden, I have done some research on this family.  Although this
story also appears in Halsted's History of Kent, there seems to be no
record (as far as I have found) of a Philip de Hardres during the
reign of king Henry III.

There does appear to have been one:

Grant from Amice, Countess of Clare, . . . to Abraham son of Ralph of
Thaxted. 1198-1223. Among the witnesses are Philippo de Hardres and
Laurentio de Hardres.

http://books.google.com/books?id=M4czS2 ... e+hardre...

"One of the earliest depictions of a donor figure in English stained
glass was in the parish church of Upper Hardres in Kent, where Philip
and Salomon de Hardres were depicted before the Virgin and Child in a
window of c.1250, since destroyed by fire."

http://books.google.com/books?id=0vMthf ... +hardres...

"Kent. Dies dat' Jacobo de Hage . po . lo . Phil de Hardres . 't fribz
Hospital de plac adv eccle de Hardres ad aud Jud suu a die Pasch i .
iij. sept."

_Rotuli ciriae regis_ (second half of King John)http://books.google.com/books?id=bqsDAAAAQAAJ&printsec=titlepage&sour...

taf

and extinct baronetage cites the earlier Philip as having been a Magna
Charta baron.

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